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Effect of beta-blocker therapy on clinical outcomes, safety, health-related quality of life and functional capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a protocol for a systematic literature review and meta-analysis with multipl

14 Nov 2018

Introduction

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who have a clinical indication for beta-blocker therapy, are often not prescribed such medication, despite evidence suggesting that beta-blockers are not associated with adverse respiratory outcomes. The primary objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to examine the class effect of beta-blocker use in patients with COPD. We will focus on a broad range of endpoints including, clinical, safety, and patient-centric outcomes such as health related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional capacity. A secondary objective is to explore potential within-class variation in the effects of beta-blockers among patients with COPD, and rank individual agents according to their relative benefit(s).

Methods and analysis

MEDLINE, Embase, The Cochrane Library and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases will be systematically searched, from inception to present, to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and other prospective and interventional studies of beta-blocker use in patients with COPD which report on the outcomes of interest. Relative treatment effects with respect to mortality, COPD exacerbations, all-cause hospitalisation, lung function, HRQoL and exercise capacity will be summarised by meta-analysis. Individual treatments (agents) will be compared in a Bayesian network meta-analysis including RCT and observational data, if feasible.

Ethics and dissemination

The results of the study will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Only previously published aggregate data will be used for the purpose of this review.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42018098983.

Click here to view the full article which appeared in BMJ Open